Singapore Chinese New Year Holiday

Chinese New Year is also known as “Spring Festival” and “Lunar New Year”. Under the Singapore Employment Act, public holidays for the upcoming years from Chinese New Year 2020 are as follows:

DateDayHoliday
5 Feb 2019TuesdayChinese New Year 2019
6 Feb 2019WednesdaySecond Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2019
25 Jan 2020SaturdayChinese New Year 2020
26 Jan 2020Sunday*Second Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2020
27 Jan 2020MondayThird Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2020
12 Feb 2021FridayChinese New Year 2021
13 Feb 2021SaturdaySecond Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2021
14 Feb 2021SundayThird Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2021
1 Feb 2022TuesdayChinese New Year 2022
2 Feb 2022WednesdaySecond Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2022
22 Jan 2023Sunday*Chinese New Year 2023
23 Jan 2023MondaySecond Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2023
10 Feb 2024SaturdayChinese New Year 2024
11 Feb 2024Sunday*Second Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2024
12 Feb 2024MondayThird Day of Chinese New Year Holiday 2024

Note: Any holidays that fall on a Sunday will be replaced the following Monday. The dates in the table above are an estimate and will be updated once official dates are announced.


Singapore Public Holidays
New Year's Day in SingaporeGood Friday in Singapore

Celebrations of the Chinese New Year in Singapore and the Things you can do

Chinese New Year in SingaporeIn Singapore, Spring Festival, commonly known as Chinese New Year (CNY), is a significant festive to celebrate given that majority of Singapore’s population is Chinese! Based on the lunar calendar, the festival falls on the first day of the first month which differs every year. CNY is also the time when families get together to enjoy the wonderful festive together. This festive is rich with customs and traditions to attract good luck in the new year.

Spring Cleaning is one of the traditions of CNY as a way to “sweep out the old in order to usher in the new” which signifies the removal of bad luck while welcoming new luck. Spring cleaning have to be done prior to CNY as sweeping the house during CNY is considered unlucky as you could be sweeping the new incoming good luck away!

Spring Cleaning is one of the traditions of CNYShopping for new outfits to wear for CNY celebrations is equally essential as wearing new clothing signifies a brand-new start for the new year. Chinese from the older generations loves wearing Qipao (Traditional Chinese Costume) while younger generations shop for pretty outfit of the day (OOTD). Red clothing is most popular among elderly while young adults are in favour of bright and cheerful colours. However, white and black clothing should be avoided during CNY as white colour usually associated with mourning and black may symbolize a lack of cultural awareness.

Traditionally, reunion dinner falls on CNY’s Eve and it is considered to be one of the most important dinners for Chinese families. It is also the time when family members who live apart get together to spend time with their loved ones. Some families gather at popular restaurants in Singapore for their reunion dinner while other families prefer having their reunion dinner at home. Traditional reunion dinner features steamboat dining, thus families having their dinner at home need additional effort for grocery shopping and preparation of the dishes.

Prosperity Toss, also known as YuSheng, is a traditional saladProsperity Toss, also known as YuSheng, is a traditional salad prepared just once a year – during CNY. It comprises of a variety of ingredients and each ingredient promises luck and prosperity. It translates to ‘tossing good fortune’, hence you are expected to throw that salad as high as possible before eating it. Since the salad is to bring good luck to anyone who eats, be sure to have a taste of it!

 

How the Chinese New Year in Singapore is Celebrated

Other than the traditions held to mark the Chinese Year at the family level, there are other celebrations for the New Year held for the public in Singapore.

They include the following-:
Chingay Parade is Asia’s largest street performance and float paradeThe Main Public Event
– in Singapore, the Chingay Parade happens to be the main public event to celebrate the CNY. The Chingay Parade is Asia’s largest street performance and float parade. It is also an annual street parade held in Singapore for celebration of CNY. It starts approximately eight days after the CNY. The word Chingay is equivalent to the Mandarin zhuang yi, which means “the art of costume and masquerade” in the Hokkien dialect. The parade features a carnival-like atmosphere with magical shows, fireworks and several heart throbbing Chinese cultural performances. Definitely worth going!

River Hongbao Celebrations normally held at the Marina Bay floating platformRiver Hongbao Celebrations – this is a celebration that takes place after fifteen days of CNY and will lasts for nine days. It is normally held at the Marina Bay floating platform and at the Esplanade Waterfront Promenade. The celebration features lots of vendors selling all kinds of food and handicrafts. Not only that, there are also traditional performances, cultural and entertaining activities for both adults and children to enjoy! Definitely not forgetting about the incredible displays of lanterns and the giant glowing God of Fortune!

The Chinese Festival Arts – this is a ten-day long event that commences on the fifth day of the CNY. The venue of event is usually at the Esplanade Waterfront Promenade. One of the major highlights of the event is the massive displays of visual and performing arts.

 

What to do during Chinese New Year in Singapore

There are a plethora of things you can see and do during Chinese New Year celebrations in Singapore. Here is a brief look at some of them-:

Find Fu in Chinatown simply means “finding good luck” by visiting ChinatownFind Fu in Chinatown – Chinatown in Singapore, as always, will host a wide variety of activities during CNY. For example, Find Fu in Chinatown simply means “finding good luck” by visiting Chinatown in search of excellent souvenirs. You may end up spending a little fortune for the festive items in Chinatown.

Visitors will offer oranges as a sign of wealth to Buddha or for blessings by the monksPay Respect to Buddha – During CNY, the Chinese temples in Singapore host various activities. Visitors will offer oranges as a sign of wealth to Buddha or for blessings by the monks. You can visit Thian Hock Heng Temple or Buddha Tooth Relic Temple & Museum during CNY to seek wealth and blessings as well as to indulge in ongoing Chinese cultural practices that mark the CNY celebrations.

With all the above interesting traditions and fun activities, Chinese New Year celebrations in Singapore will never be a boring one. If you have the time, you may want to set aside two weeks to join us in the fun and get the most out of the Singaporean CNY celebrations!

Public Holiday - Chinese New Year in Singapore